Black Feminism

e. nina jay's body of rooms

e. nina jay's body of rooms

I walk with e. nina jay’s poems the way that I’ve walked with the (Audre) Lorde’s prose and poetry. It took me a minute before I watched her on-screen performance of the poems because I knew I had to be ready.

these beautiful rooms
these beautiful rooms
I am opening the doors
To these chaotic rooms
This house is no tomb
This life is not doomed
This black rose can bloom
I will make a home
Of this body of rooms

e. nina jay, body of rooms

From the moment and I mean the absolute moment I hit play on my dvd player, e nina jay pulled me into the screen and would not let me leave the room until the last credit rolled up the screen. 

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Aishah Shahidah Simmons' Reflects Upon the Women's March on Washington in the New York Times

You can read this article and the full chorus of the eight women who weighed in on The New York Times as well:

I’ve had a lot of mixed feelings about the Women's March on Washington.

As a pro-choice black feminist lesbian who voted for Hillary Clinton I found myself asking: Which women? The majority of black women voters did all we could do to prevent what will happen on Jan. 20, 2017. I was alarmed that the original framing of the march ignored the role of race in the struggle for equality for women. The organizers were all white women and were calling it the Million Women March -- a huge faux pas given that the first Million Woman March, in 1997, was organized by black women. I was among the hundreds of thousands who gathered in Philadelphia.

Since its original framing, the march has evolved. Three powerhouse women of color — Tamika D. MalloryCarmen Perez and Linda Sarsour — have joined Bob Bland as the national co-chairs

Their mission is clear. This major gathering in Washington, and other cities across the United States and internationally, to send a message to Donald J. Trump, his administration and the world that all women’s rights are human rights and that those who march defend and stand in solidarity with the most marginalized. 

I’m cautiously optimistic about the march. As an activist and the daughter of two veterans of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, I believe in the power of marches. The inauguration of Trump is plenty of reason to protest. And yet, the Women’s March organizers don’t call it a protest. 

But that's O.K. because we need multilayered strategies to challenge and resist any efforts to rollback the gains we’ve made in women’s rights, civil rights, L.G.B.T.Q. rights and immigrant rights over the last 50 years.

Reflecting Upon Nate Parker and Deconstructing Rape Myths with Aaronette M. White, Ph.D.

High profile celebrity cisgender Black men who commit gender-based violence are scrutinized and held accountable by the white mainstream media and criminal justice system in ways that their white counterparts are not. However, as Heidi, Kebo, Tarana, and Tamura have all articulated, we cannot allow the relentless, vicious racism and white supremacy committed against Black people to silence the brutal intra-racial patriarchy and misogyny in all of its violent manifestations in Black communities.  My Black feminist lesbian incest and rape survivor body will never ever be safe and free with the eradication of white supremacy and racism alone.

We must dispel and deconstruct rape myths.

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