NO! The Rape Documentary

Aishah Shahidah Simmons on Wake Up With WURD

Aishah Shahidah Simmons joined Wake Up With WURD guest host Dr. Aaron Smith to discuss the recent Bill Cosby verdict, her film NO! The Rape Documentary, her project #LoveWITHAccountability, and the imperative need to address and end racial and gender violence. WURD-900AM radio is Pennsylvania's only Black owned talk radio station.

Read More

Dr. Treva Lindsey highlights Black women's decades-long anti-rape activism to contextualize Bill Cosby conviction

Black feminist scholar Dr. Treva B. Lindsey places the Bill Cosby rape conviction alongside a continuum of Black women's anti-rape activism in her April 26, 2018 article for Vox.com

[...] "it’s important to recognize that years of black women’s anti-rape and anti-sexual assault activism have helped produce our current robust national conversation about sexual violence. It may not be a full moment of reckoning just yet, but the tireless organizing of black women has made it possible for us to have more productive conversations about rape culture and the meaning of consent.

Read More

NO! The Rape Documentary at Westwood Baptist Church

wokeatthewood.jpg

The Westwood Baptist Church in Richmond, VA where Rev. Michael Lomax is the pastor will host a FREE all day conference on sexual violence, accountability and healing on Saturday, April 21, 2018. There will be a panel, a screening of NO! The Rape Documentary, and a keynote by #BlackFeminist sister/scholar/comrade/friend, co-founder of The Feminist Wire, and the first lady of Westwood Baptist Church, Dr. Tamura Lomax. 

SPREAD THE WORD. This FREE intergenerational gathering is open to all. You can register here.

Aishah Shahidah Simmons in Tagg Magazine

Aishah Shahidah Simmons was one of several LGBTQI individuals who paid homage to the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice in Eboné Bell’s, “Astraea Foundation Investing, Advocating, Amplifying, and Propelling LGBTQI Voices” in Tagg Magazine

 

“Over 20-years ago the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice was the first foundation that supported an unknown unapologetically out, twenty-something Black feminist lesbian rape survivor making a feature length documentary film about sexual violence and healing in Black communities.  Astrea’s institutional support legitimized both the filmmaker and the film, NO! The Rape Documentary, which became an internationally acclaimed award-winning film that has transformed the lives of many survivors across the United States and internationally. Fast forward twenty years later and my support for Astraea support is unwavering just as theirs has been for countless lesbians and queer people like me who had nowhere else to turn.” -- Aishah Shahidah Simmons, Producer/Director, NO! The Rape Documentary

Click here to read the article in its entirety

NO! The Rape Documentary in Tucson

Aishah will kick off April's Sexual Assault Awareness month in Tuscon, Arizona with a fundraiser screening of NO! The Rape Documentary on Tuesday, April 3, 2018 at 7:30pm.

All proceeds will go towards the planning of Tucson Take Back the Night 2018, the annual march and event raising awareness around sexual assault and empowering survivors.

Aishah was also featured on a local news segment.

TBTN Loft 11 x 17 FINAL.jpg

Cassius Chats: Aishah Shahidah Simmons on ‘NO! The Rape Documentary,' Essex Hemphill, and Reviving His Spirit in the #MeToo

On International Women's Day, Aishah Shahidah Simmons released the Essex Hemphill segment featured in NO! The Rape Documentary as a separate stand-alone video.

Cassius Life Magazine's news and culture editor Stephanie Long interviewed Aishah and published their conversation on March 14, 2018.

An Excerpt:

When NO! The Rape Documentary first debuted at the Pan African Film Festival in 2006, it was received with critical acclaim. Among the 50 documentaries and short films invited to be a part of the Open Frame Film Festival in 2009, NO! took home the Audience Choice Award and a Juried Award at the 2006 Sandiego Women Film Festival. It also won the award for Best Documentary at the 2008 India International Women’s Film Festival.

Now, for the first time, the film’s Essex Hemphill segment has been made into a stand-alone video. “I decided to make it a stand-alone short video this year because I believe it’s very important that we hear from Black men who are unwavering about the imperative need to address and end sexual and domestic violence in our communities,”Aishah Shahidah Simmons, director of NO!, told CASSIUS. “I worked with my friend and colleague Dr. Kai Green, who helped me create the stand alone video in his office at Williams College.” 

...

C.: What went into making the decision to release this segment this year? Was it meant to be released sooner?

A.S.: The decision to release the Essex Hemphill segment as a standalone video separate from and still related to NO! The Rape Documentary was based on my desire to celebrate Black women in Women’s Herstory Month, and to lift up Hemphill’s radical vision of a world that respects and cherishes Black women long before it was trending. Hemphill’s poem, “To Some Supposed Brothers,” is a powerful acknowledgement of the wounds that so many Black women have to live with. Written almost three decades ago, his words and delivery have a compelling way of drawing you into a painful reality, while simultaneously calling the viewer into action to co-create a world without violence. Hemphill’s work was so piercing. He didn’t feel the necessity to sugar coat his words or images in order to make the audience feel good. His intention was to make you uncomfortable in order to affect radical social change.

C.: Can you tell us a little about raising funds to have the segment edited back in 1997 and why that was important?

A.S.: Fundraising for the making of the film was a hardcore Black feminist and LGBTQ grassroots effort. In the early days of the 12-year journey, I relied heavily upon the communities from which I come to support this vision. Award-winning poet and activist Sonia Sanchez  and longterm activists Inelle Cox Bagwell and Pat Clark were the first people who gave major donations in support of the making of NO! The Rape Documentary. The Astraa Lesbian Foundation for Justice was the very first foundation who said, “YES! to NO!” Their collective funding enabled me to create two trailers, which featured the Essex Hemphill segment and testimonies from Black women rape survivors. I screened these trailers extensively across the United States and in several European countries including England, The Netherlands, France, and Italy at numerous educational fundraising screenings. The money raised at those screenings went directly into the making of the feature length documentary film.

Click here to read in its entirety here.

Aishah Shahidah Simmons Keynotes Five College Queer Gender and Sexuality Conference

IMG_1550.JPG

Aishah Shahidah Simmons was the keynote speaker at the Five College Queer Gender and Sexuality Conference, which was be held March 2-3 at Hampshire College. The title of her talk was AfroLezfemcentric Perspectives on Race, Gender, and Sexuality. 

Pull Up The Roots Of Child Sexual Abuse

Below I am sharing the individual screen shots of my @Afrolez twitter thread on child sexual abuse and adult rape.

On Kevin Spacey & Recentering the Dialogue

For decades upon decades LGBTQIA anti-sexual violence activists have worked TIRELESSLY to stop the vicious homophobic and transphobic conflation of sexual violence with sexual orientation and gender identity.

Rather than focus on ending sexual violence routinely committed against children and adults, especially those who are the most marginalized, attention is focused on why someone is LGBTQIA.

queeringviolence.jpg

This is one of many reasons why Kevin Spacey's coming out of the celluloid closet responses to being accused of causing harm 30 years ago to a 14-year old boy are despicable and unprincipled. What the HELL does his (FINALLY) living as an out gay man have to do with his attempted sexual misconduct with a minor twelve years his junior? These are separate issues.

I do not want to hear about sexual exploration and I write as a unapologetic Black lesbian/queer woman child sexual abuse and adult rape survivor who also explored her sexuality as a teenager. I want to hear about adult accountability. PERIOD.

LGBTQIA children and teenagers are some of the most vulnerable to being sexually violated by adults.

If you are looking for resources to help you get a grasp of sexual violence outside of the heterosexual cisgender man/boy harming the cisgender woman/girl, here are three of several: sibling survivor/comrade/friend Amita Swadhin's Mirror Memoirs project has collected over 40 (to date) oral her/hxstories/histories from queer and trans child sexual abuse survivors of color. What they are uncovering through this groundbreaking work is mind blowing. Sibling survivor/comrade/friend Ignacio G Rivera's The HEAL Project aims to prevent and end child sexual abuse by making visible the hidden tools used to guilt, shame, coerce and inflict violence onto children. Sibling survivor/comrade/friend Jennifer Patterson's edited award-winning anthology Queering Sexual Violence features multi-racial, multi-gender LGBTQIA survivors and activists whose writings are at the intersection of survivor status, race, sexuality, gender identity, mental health and disability.

Let's work to end ALL forms of sexual violence committed against ALL humans.